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Interaction Analysis. Assessing the effect of the business activities and data on each other. in .NET Creation barcode data matrix in .NET Interaction Analysis. Assessing the effect of the business activities and data on each other.

Interaction Analysis. Assessing the effect of the business activities and data on each other. using barcode maker for visual studio .net control to generate, create datamatrix 2d barcode image in visual studio .net applications. Reading Data Matrix ECC200 Product Assurance tasks 2d Data Matrix barcode for .NET provide the development project with a system of checks and balances. These checks and balances are realized through the integrated application of the following four processes:.

Successful Software Development, Second Edition Quality Assurance. Chec .net framework datamatrix 2d barcode ks whether the software conforms to established standards and exposes parts that don"t conform.

If under "standards" are included things like software development plans, the QA process checks whether the product development process itself conforms to what the software development staff said it was going to do. Thus, with these definitions, product quality and process quality mean, respectively, conformance with product standards and conformance with process standards..

Verification and Valida tion. Checks for any oversights or deviations from customer requirements and predecessor products and exposes them..

Test and Evaluation. Ex data matrix barcodes for .NET ercises software code and data, checks for shortfalls from requirements and design documents and then exposes them.

T&E is thus a special case of V&V.. Configuration Managemen t. Balances the need to make changes with a visible, traceable, and formal way to control those changes. The need for change arises primarily from the application of the other three product assurance processes.

. Figure 2-8 shows the in barcode data matrix for .NET dividual tasks to be performed in a given life cycle stage. The following is an interpretation of these tasks:.

For the Work Planning t ask during the Information Strategy Planning Stage (first row, first column, of IE life cycle work stages), the scope of the work to be performed and the standards to be followed during the life cycle stages are often defined by the customer management, reviewed by seller project staff, and approved by both the customer and seller management. The project plan is defined by the seller project staff, then reviewed and approved by both customer and seller management. For the Management Review task during the Information Strategy Planning Stage (second row, first column, of IE life cycle work stages), the information needs of the organization, the project plan, and the supporting architectures are defined by project staff, then reviewed and approved by both customer and seller management.

For the Information Gathering task during the Information Strategy Planning Stage (third row, first column, of IE life cycle work stages), the project team performs this task using project work groups and facilitated workshop sessions, such as joint requirements planning (JRP) and joint application design (JAD) sessions. Programmatic experts and customer representatives supply information about the customer"s mission, organization, critical success factors, and information needs in order to plan the project work group sessions. Seller project team members and customer representatives jointly develop the agenda, invite the attendee list, and conduct the workshops with middle-level customer organization managers.

Information is collected about the organization, information architecture, and technical architecture. Quality assurance tables are constructed, capturing key quality. Successful Software Development, Second Edition characteristics for org anization data and activities. After the information has been analyzed, workshops are conducted with the customer"s top-level managers and staff. Following each workshop, minutes are prepared and the information that has been gathered is analyzed.

For the Data Analysis task during the Business Area Analysis Stage (fourth row, second column, of IE life cycle work stages), the data are analyzed for the customer"s business area. The subject areas identified in the Information Strategy Planning Stage are expanded in detail and evolve into the definitions for entity types, relationships, and attributes, which are captured in an entity relationship diagram (ERD). Partitioning, attribute classification, and value derivation lead to an entity hierarchical diagram (EHD).

Together, these two types of diagrams form the logical data model that is a picture of the data required and their relationships for the defined business area. For Activity Analysis during the Business Area Analysis Stage (fifth row, second column, of IE life cycle work stages), the functions and their dependencies defined in the Information Strategy Planning Stage are further decomposed into processes (and corresponding process dependencies). The hierarchical relationships of the activities performed by the business are determined, as well as the description of what each process does and what entity types each process affects.

A dependency analysis is performed to relate the lowest-level processes to each other to validate that all the activities have been identified. The result of this activity analysis is a set of dependency diagrams and an activity hierarchy diagram. For Interaction Analysis during the Business Area Analysis Stage (sixth row, second column, of IE life cycle work stages), the processes are related to the entity types, attributes, and relationships.

Changes to each entity type by various processes from their creation to termination are analyzed and documented in an entity life cycle or entity state transition diagram (also referred to as life cycle analysis). This step validates the data and processes by verifying that the entire life cycle of the particular entity type is addressed. As part of the interaction analysis, the process logic for the lowest-level processes is defined and represented as process action diagrams.

These process definitions are part of the building blocks for the Business Systems Design Stage. For the Quality Assurance task during any IE life cycle stage, process and product quality are checked, respectively, by (1) checking a product against a standard for that product and (2) checking a process against a plan defining how the process is to be carried out. For example, to check for process quality in the Business Area Analysis Stage, a checklist is derived from the analysis plan and is used as the basis for determining whether the engineering process defined in the plan is followed.

An example of a product QA check in the Business Area Analysis Stage would be comparing an Entity Relationship Diagram (ERD) against a standard defining how ERDs are to be constructed. For the Verification and Validation task during any IE life cycle stage, a product is checked against predecessor products. For example, this activity checks that an ERD, defined in the Business Area Analysis Stage, is carrying through the intent of the subject areas, defined in the Information Strategy Planning Stage.

For the Test and Evaluation task during early IE life cycle stages, test planning documentation indicating what testing is to be performed is prepared; during later IE stages, test procedure documentation indicating how the testing is to be performed is prepared. For example, in the Business Systems Design Stage, a test plan is developed.
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